Monthly Archives :

December 2010

Purchasing Seed

Purchasing Seed

Read More

There are two ways to purchase grass seed.  One method is to visit the garden section of a retail store and pick out a package labeled with intended use, such as “Shade Mix.”  Alternatively, you can buy the latest cultivars and make up your own mix. Either way you will still need to know the basics about purchasing seed, beginning with the terms species and cultivar.  Species refers to a group…

native grasses

Native Grasses

Read More

Native Grasses Native Grasses are survivors having evolved and adapted to the arid grassland plains. Unlike turfgrasses, native grasses are open and natural in appearance, and require little maintenance.  Native Grasses prefer full sun so grow best during the hot summer months.  Native Grasses are especially suited to the Central Plains states but have been widely adapted across the United States and Canada.  Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service (CSREES)…

Cool-Season, Warm-Season, or Transition Zone

Cool-Season, Warm-Season, or Transition Zone

Read More

There is no breed of grass able to thrive on both a Vermont ski slope and a Florida orange grove.  For this reason grasses are divided into two main groups, cool-season and warm-season, and then further divided into two subgroups,  transition zone and native. Cool-season grasses all thrive in northern areas, including Canada, as well as higher elevations farther south.  The main growing period for cool-season grass is in spring and…

Create a Garden to Attract Beneficial Insects

Create a Garden to Attract Beneficial Insects

Read More

To encourage high beneficial insect populations design your garden to incorporate a variety of flowering plants rich in nectar and pollen.  Choose cultivars with easily accessible pollen found in plants with a single layer of petals or a tubular flower form.  Common herbs, wildflowers, and scented plants are all attractive to beneficial insects.  Do not clear out dead foliage in the fall, this is an important habitat for beneficial over…

Kickball

Read More

Kickball—originally called “Kick Baseball”—is a game similar to baseball, invented in 1917, Nicholas C. Seuss, Supervisor of Cincinnati Park Playgrounds. The game is played like baseball/softball, with the exception that the ball is kicked rather than hit.  The pitcher rolls the ball towards the catcher, the “batter” kicks it with his foot, then runs to first base, becoming a runner.  There is no “official” set of Kickball Rules as all…

Ring Toss

Read More

Ring toss is a fun summer recreational activity. It is simple to play and can provide a family with hours of fun.  The Basics: Toss the ring onto the peg—sounds easy, but it is not. Each player is given 5 plastic rings to use during game play. The player may toss or flip the rings one at a time onto the pegs. A ring that lands completely around a peg,…

Close Only Counts in Horseshoes …

Read More

It is estimated games with Horseshoes started as early as the 2nd century.  Modern Horseshoes is an outdoor game played between two people (or two teams of two people) using four horseshoes and two throwing targets (stakes).  Players take turns tossing horseshoes at stakes in the ground, which are traditionally placed 40-feet apart.  Modern games use a more stylized U-shaped bar, about twice the size of an actual horseshoe. In…

T-ball

Read More

T-Ball, or Teeball, is a sport based on baseball and is intended as an introduction for children to develop baseball skills and have fun.  The origins of T-ball are not certain, but it is believed to date back to the 1940s or 50s. In T-Ball, the pitcher is usually used for defensive purposes only.  The ball is placed on an adjustable tee atop the home plate at a suitable height…