News Tab

Category : planting a new lawn

Planting Your Lawn

Methods of Planting a Lawn

Read More

There are four methods to planting a new lawn: sod, seed, sprigs, and plugs. Sod Apply a starter fertilizer high in phosphorus, such as 2:1:1 or 1:1:1 ratio, then lightly water the area.  Have the pallets of sod delivered to a shady spot if possible and begin work immediately upon delivery of your order.  Sod can go bad quickly, especially if it heats up or dries out.  If you cannot…

a lush green lawn and beautiful flower beds

How to Design a Beautiful Yard That’s Mower-Friendly

Read More

One of the good things about fall is we get to start planning our lawns and landscapes for next year. Some of us may be thinking about ways to enhance a plain lawn, while others are looking for a way to make it easier to mow around beds, features and plantings. These design tips will make it easier to mow, while giving your yard a more finished, landscaped look. Create…

Six Steps to Planting a New Lawn

Read More

Planting a new lawn is a big job; it may be best to tackle the project in sections. You can begin this process by redoing the worst or most visible lawn areas, and then make plans to tackle the remaining areas the following year. Starting with smaller sections instead of the entire lawn keeps the job manageable and makes the critical step of watering feasible for homeowners who do not have…

Methods of Removing Turf

Read More

When planting a new lawn, the first step is to kill and remove any poor-quality turf. This process can be accomplished through several methods including solarization, heavy mulches, hoes or sod cutters, and herbicides. When selecting your method, keep your lawn and climate conditions in mind, as some methods may be a better fit for your lawn than others. Solarization: Cut the old lawn as close to grade as possible before you begin….

Fixing Grade Problems

Read More

When planting a new lawn, take the time to fix any existing grade problems (after removing the old turf and before adding amendments to the soil). For minor grading problems, small versions of earth-moving equipment are often available to rent or buy.  You can also use a landscaping rake for working topsoil to the proper grade. To make minor grade adjustments use a landscape rake. Water the area.  Later, fill where…

Caring for Your New Lawn

Caring for a Newly Planted Lawn

Read More

You have put a lot of work into creating a new lawn, so don’t forget the most important step.  Plan for watering needs before you plant your lawn.  Insufficient water and overwatering are the leading causes of new-lawn failure.  Take precautions to prevent damage.  Minimize play and foot traffic on new and sodded lawns for at least three weeks. Do not fertilize new lawns for at least six weeks. After…

Comparing Various Lawn Planting Methods

Read More

Before replanting, spread plastic over the area to let heat kill off old turf.  Seal the edges with boards or soil.  See Six Steps to Planting a new Lawn for further information. Find out the planting method that works best for you, whether you live North or South.

Purchasing Seed

Read More

There are two ways to purchase grass seed.  One method is to visit the garden section of a retail store and pick out a package labeled with intended use, such as “Shade Mix.”  Alternatively, you can buy the latest cultivars and make up your own mix. Either way you will still need to know the basics about purchasing seed, beginning with the terms species and cultivar.  Species refers to a group…

Beautiful lawn

Starting From Scratch—Planting a New Lawn

Read More

Whether you purchased a new home with dirt as your new lawn or you may have a lawn suffering from acute soil compaction, rampant weed problems, heavy thatch, or nutrient and organic matter deficiencies.  In either case, it is time to plant a new lawn. There are several ways you can plant a new lawn: seed, sprigs or plugs, or sod.  You can also hire a professional to spray a…

Grass is grass is grass… or is it?

Basic Distinctions

Read More

Different species of grasses have distinctive growth habits that will affect the appearance of turf. Bunchgrasses Bunchgrasses, such as ryegrasses and most fescues, do not spread but enlarge through the growth of sideshoots or tillers.  Bunchgrasses are easy to spot if your lawn thins out because the grass looks like small clumps or islands arising from the same crown.  Bunchgrasses wear well, but do not form a solid sod.  You…