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Grass-plugs, sprigs

Warm-Season Grasses | Choose the Right Grass

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St. Augustinegrass (Stenotaphrum secundatum) Easily grown from sod, plugs, or sprigs, St. Augustinegrass produces a dense blue-green turf that has good shade and salt tolerance.  It is highly popular in coastal areas from Florida to California. Drawbacks:  Thick thatch if heavily fertilized and watered.  Vulnerable to chinch bugs and grubs. Recommendations: For USDA Hardiness Zones 8 to 10.  According to the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP), look for slow-growing Amerishade, cold…

Cool-Season Grasses | Choosing the Right Grass

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Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) For a deep green, fine-textured, attractive lawn, choose Kentucky bluegrass.  Bluegrass is able to withstand moisture and temperature extremes, is winter hardy, and will grow in full sun to light shade depending on cultivar and location.  Sown by seed and spread by rhizomes and tillers, it forms strong, dense sod that recovers well from injury.  Maintenance requirements for Kentucky bluegrass vary.  Older common cultivars require less…

Comparing Various Lawn Planting Methods

Comparing Various Lawn Planting Methods

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Before replanting, spread plastic over the area to let heat kill off old turf.  Seal the edges with boards or soil.  See Six Steps to Planting a new Lawn for further information. Find out the planting method that works best for you, whether you live North or South.

native grasses

Native Grasses

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Native Grasses Native Grasses are survivors having evolved and adapted to the arid grassland plains. Unlike turfgrasses, native grasses are open and natural in appearance and require little maintenance.  Native Grasses prefer full sun to grow best during the hot summer months.  Native Grasses are especially suited to the Central Plains states but have been widely adapted across the United States and Canada.  Check with your local Cooperative Extension Service…

How to stripe like a pro

How to Stripe Your Lawn Like a Pro

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Any great work of art must start with good canvas…

What's the Deal With Lawn Striping

What’s the Deal With Lawn Striping?

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At the same time you mow, you can create everything from simple, professional stripes to an eye-catching piece of art. Lawn striping, lawnscapes, yard art, whatever you call it, it’s beautiful.  Sports venues have been adding stripes, waves, and checkerboards to their fields for years.  Now homeowners can add a professional look to their yards, too! You might think it takes hours of work, but you can create simple patterns…

Fixing Grade Problems

Fixing Grade Problems in Your Lawn

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When planting a new lawn, take the time to fix any existing grade problems (after removing the old turf and before adding amendments to the soil). For minor grading problems, small versions of earth-moving equipment are often available to rent or buy.  You can also use a landscaping rake for working topsoil to the proper grade. To make minor grade adjustments use a landscape rake. Water the area.  Later, fill where…

Caring for Your New Lawn

How to Care for a Newly Planted Lawn

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You have put a lot of work into creating a new lawn, so don’t forget the most important step.  Plan for watering needs before you plant your lawn.  Insufficient water and overwatering are the leading causes of new-lawn failure.  Take precautions to prevent damage.  Minimize play and foot traffic on new and sodded lawns for at least three weeks. Do not fertilize new lawns for at least six weeks. After…