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how to overseed

How to Overseed Your Lawn When Reseeding

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When the temperatures start to cool off and your lawn looks like it could use a boost, overseeding, otherwise known as reseeding your lawn, can lend a big hand in helping revive your lawn. Get the most out of your overseeding through thoroughness not just in spreading of the seed, but also in the prep and after-care of your lawn. Prep Your Lawn Lawn prep for overseeding relies on the combination of the…

reseeding lawn

The Basics of Overseeding (Reseeding) a Lawn

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Overseeding, commonly known as reseeding your lawn, is a simple way to jump-start new turf growth and thicken your lawn. By spreading fresh grass seed over existing grass, you are able to fill in thin spots to achieve a lusher lawn without tearing up any turf or soil. Does My Lawn Need It? Not every lawn needs overseeding. Lawns that are looking especially tired from the stresses of summer heat,…

How To Kill Weeds Naturally

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Most spring weed prevention tips will tell you to invest in a powerful weed killer and to remove any dandelions before they go to seed—and this is sound advice. However, in order to make the kind of change that will last, it’s important to start good, healthy lawn habits that will carry you through every season.   How to Prevent Dandelion Growth The best thing you can do to prevent…

Improving the Health of Your Lawn

Improving the Health of Your Lawn

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Let’s face it: when you live in the suburbs, a healthy, well-kept lawn is a must.  Before anyone even steps into your house, it’s your front lawn that makes the first impression of your home.  So what’s something that can help keep your lawn healthy?  Many people seem to forget about aeration.   What is Aeration? Aeration, or aerification, is a method of perforating your lawn with small holes to allow…

Mole Prevention and Eradication

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Few things are more destructive to a gently rolling landscape than moles. These voracious pests dig tunnels through the ground (often at speeds of up to a foot per minute) to seek out grubs, worms, ants, and the other insects that make up the bulk of their diet. In the United States, they are often cited as one of the most common backyard pest problems—and one look at a yard…

soil test

Work on the Down Low to Improve What’s on Top

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Horticulturists agree that time spent improving what is happening below the surface of a lawn greatly reduces the time needed to maintain what is on top of it.  The ideal soil for grass meets five requirements: 1) it is slightly acidic; 2) it contains an adequate supply of nutrients; 3) it allows for deep root growth; 4) it supports a thriving population of beneficial microbes, and 5) it retains adequate…

Beneficial Insects

Insects Beneficial for Your Lawn

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Creating an environment hostile to pests includes enlisting the help of beneficial insects.  These insects keep undesirable pest populations in check through their feeding, as either predators or parasites.  Both the adult and immature stages of predators actively search out and consume prey.  Parasites help by depositing eggs in or on the host.  When they hatch, the host becomes their food source. What can you do to encourage helpful insects? …

Common Lawn Weeds

Common Lawn Weeds

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Here are the most common weeds and recommendations to eliminate. Annual bluegrass (Poa annua) Frequently found in compacted, infertile soils, this light green, low-growing grassy annual prefers cool-season growth, but can be found all year.  A sudden brown-out of the lawn in the heat of summer, or prolific seed production in spring, signals its presence.  When seeds appear, rake the grass upright, then mow, and bag the clippings. Crabgrass (Digitaria…

Spring through fall lawn diseases

Spring-Through-Fall Lawn Diseases

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Fairy Rings Caused by more than 50 varieties of fungus, the rings vary in size and appearance but all form in damp conditions in soil that is high in woody organic matter, which is usually from buried debris or tree stumps. Look for: Rings of fast-growing, dark-green grass with centers composed of weeds, thin turf, or dead grass. Midsummer and fall rings are more apt to be composed of dead grass….

Create a Garden to Attract Beneficial Insects

Create a Garden to Attract Beneficial Insects

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To encourage high beneficial insect populations design your garden to incorporate a variety of flowering plants rich in nectar and pollen.  Choose cultivars with easily accessible pollen found in plants with a single layer of petals or a tubular flower form.  Common herbs, wildflowers, and scented plants are all attractive to beneficial insects.  Do not clear out dead foliage in the fall, this is an important habitat for beneficial over…